What is a QR Code?

Quick response, or QR, is a type of barcode that can store a multitude of information. The obvious difference between a QR Code and Barcode is its appearance. A QR Code is always in the shape of a square and contains smaller, even blocks similar to Tetris. A Barcode, on the other hand, has vertical bars in different thicknesses and is often accompanied by a serial number.

The clear difference between these two codes is their appearance

 

 

Because of its versatility, a QR Code can be programmed to do a multitude of things. It can be split into formats: Dynamic and Static. A Dynamic QR Code is useful for restaurant businesses in their marketing strategy because of its advantages. Though it needs a subscription to work, it is a small price to pay compared to the benefits it offers. Zebra QR offers dynamic QR Code solutions that are editable, which means if you made a mistake and only noticed it after the QR Codes are printed, we can easily log in to the dashboard and fix them without changing the appearance of the already printed codes. This could be useful for these reasons.

 

 

 

History of QR Code

The QR code system was invented in 1994 by Masahiro Hara from the Japanese company Denso Wave. The initial design was influenced by the black and white pieces on a Go board. Its purpose was to track vehicles during manufacturing; it was designed to allow high-speed component scanning. QR codes are now used in a much broader context, including both commercial tracking applications and convenience-oriented applications aimed at mobile phone users (termed mobile tagging). QR codes may be used to display text to the user, to open a webpage on the user’s device, to add a vCard contact to the user’s device, to open a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI), to connect to a wireless network, or to compose an email or text message. There are a great many QR code generators available as software or as online tools that are either free or require a paid subscription The QR code has become one of the most-used types of two-dimensional code.

 

 

Adoption of QR code

During the month of June 2011, 14 million American mobile users scanned a QR code or a barcode. Some 58% of those users scanned a QR or barcode from their homes, while 39% scanned from retail stores; 53% of the 14 million users were men between the ages of 18 and 34. QR code usage decreased to 9.76 million in 2018 but is expected to grow to a total of 11 million households by the end of 2020.

 

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